Posts Tagged ‘script’

The Windows WMI Command Line Utility

Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) allows you to write scripts and expose information about a Windows 7 resource or service. As we have seen in the previous post – Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI), WMI allows you to access system management information from the command-line interface! WMI can become handy when you need to retrieve specific information which may be not available from the GUI. Mastering the WMI command line utility may turn you into command line freak never wanting to leave the command line.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by George - January 19, 2012 at 3:20 am

Categories: Management, Utilities   Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI)

Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) allows you to write scripts that configure performance settings and resolve performance issues. System performance is dependant on many factors and settings, and the amount of resources every service or process consumes. With WMI, you can write scripts that manage event logs, file systems, printers, processes, registry settings, scheduled tasks, security, services, shared folders, etc. WMI scripts can monitor and respond to entries in the event log, modifications to the file system or the registry, and other real-time operating system changes.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by George - January 17, 2012 at 3:36 am

Categories: Management, Utilities   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

AppLocker – Part 3: Rules Collections

In part 3 of this AppLocker series, we will go through the rules that AppLocker uses to allow or block specific applications. Firstly, note that explicitly defined Block rules (non generic) override any Allow rules (generic). Secondly, note that if you don’t set a default policy to allow all applications, then any application that has no Allow policy will not be allowed to execute. When creating rules you can take two different approaches, either you allow all applications to run with specific ones set as blocked, or leave the default behavior of AppLocker and then allow specific applications to run (remember to allow administrators full allow permissions and everyone to run system applications). However, it is recommended to start implementing AppLocker rules by performing an audit exercise prior to the actual enforcement of rules.

AppLocker Auditing

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by George - December 2, 2010 at 6:13 pm

Categories: Security   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Creating an answer file

An answer file gives you the control to perform an unattended installation, that is, the installation process is provided with the answers in a script file instead of having someone attending to it! You can for example, configure passwords, set default Internet Explorer settings, accepting a EULA, etc… The answer file should contain all the settings (answers) required during an installation.

Before proceeding further, I recommend you to Compress and Decompress your most popular archives with WinTar application!

To create an answer file, you use the Windows SIM utility found in Windows AIK by following these steps: Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by George - February 22, 2010 at 5:14 pm

Categories: Deployment, Installation   Tags: , , ,